piwik-script

Deutsch Intern
Mathematical Physics

Courses

Lectures, RiGs and Seminars

Here you find the teaching activities of Chair X in the current as well as in previous semesters. If already known, there is also a preview on the upcoming semester. Some of the courses are taught in English, some in German.

Future Teaching

Preliminary Program

This master course is a first introduction to geometric mechanics. We will discuss classical Newtonian mechanics using differential geometric methods within the context of symplectic geometry. The Hamiltonian approach to mechanics based on cotangent bundles as phase spaces will be central for this approach. The Lagrangean formulation of mechanics will be formulated on the tangent bundle of the configuration space. The comparison between the two will give, among many other aspects, a new look on Riemannian geometry through the symplectic looking glass. But geometric mechanics will not stop at these two (equivalent) versions but requires more general symplectic manifolds as phase spaces. In particular, the presence of symmetries and conserved quantities will lead to phase space reductions which yields quite generic symplectic manifolds as result. Finally, Poisson manifolds provide a yet more general framework of great importance when it comes to questions like quantization.

Prerequisites
Literature

A detailed list of references will be available in the WueCampus course.

Dates

Lecture:
Tutorial:
WueCampus (not yet available)

Most probably the topic will be in locally convex analysis.

Current Semester (Winter Semester 2019/2020)

Preliminary Program

 

Prerequisites

The lecture is mainly adressed to master students in mathematics and mathematical physics. You should have some knowledge in geometric analysis (differential forms), having attended a bachelor course in differential geometry (curves and surfaces in R3) is beneficial. Preknowledge from calculus and integration theory in several variables, linear algebra, and ordinary differential equations is indispensable.

Literature

A detailed list of references will be available in the WueCampus course.

Dates

Lecture: Wednesday 16-18, SE30, Thursday 14-16, SE30
Exercises: Thursday 8-10, SE30

WueCampus (Self registering)

Preliminary Program

In this master course we provide a first contact with the vast subject of algebraic topology. The main theme of the course is the deep connection between algebra and topology, that we begin to investigate via the study of algebraic invariants for topological spaces. However, it is not only algebra used in topology, but we are also led to introduce advanced algebraic techniques that are motivated from topology. The algebraic invariants are naturally formulated using the language of categories. We will consider homology and cohomology functors, homotopy groups and develop on the topological side the language of simplex categories and CW-complexes, on the algebraic side chain complexes and their homotopies and category related concepts.

Prerequisites

Basic knowledge in point-set topology and algebra is required. We will only briefly recall the notions of homotopy and fundamental group in the beginning.

Literature

A detailed list of references will be available in the WueCampus course.

Dates

Lecture: Di 14-16, Mi 10-12
Tutorial: Mo 16-18

WueCampus course (not yet available)

Preliminary Program

In this research in groups we investigate various oid-geometries. Of particupar interest will be Lie algebroids and Lie groupoids but also Courant algebroids will be discussed.

Prerequisites

This research in groups is a continuation of the lecture on symplectic and Poisson geometry: participants are expected to be familiar with basic notions of symplectic and Poisson manifolds as well as with Lie groups and their Lie algebras.

Literature

On the WueCampus one finds a detailed bibliography. More specific references for the student talks will be given as well.

Dates

Lecture: Friday 10-12 in SE 40
Seminar: The seminar will take place at one or two days at the end of the semester. The precise date will be announced.

WueCampus course

Preliminary Program

This master course will provide a first approach to locally convex spaces. The aim is two-fold: on the one hand, we will investigate locally convex spaces and continuous linear maps, dual spaces, tensor products, and their properties on a fairly general basis including detailed proofs of the main theorems of locally convex analysis like Hahn-Banach, Banach-Alaoglu, Bipolar theorem, Krein-Milman etc. On the other hand, we discuss the very explicit example of test functions and distributions for open subsets in Euclidean space or, perhaps, on manifolds. This will allow to have a more conceptual view on classical topics in functional analysis.

Prerequisites

Basic knowledge in functional analysis like Banach and Hilbert spaces is required. Moreover, we will need some notions from point-set topology like compactness, Hausdorff property, etc. If needed these will be recalled at the beginning of the lecture.

Literature

A detailed list of references will be available in the WueCampus course.

Dates

Lecture: Wednesday 14--16 in SE 30 and Thursday 10--12 in SE 31
Tutorial:  Monday 10–12 in SE 40

WueCampus course

Previous Teaching

Geometrische Analysis (Prof. Dr. Knut Hüper)

Ziel dieser Vorlesung ist es den Satz von Stokes auf Untermannigfaltigkeiten zu verstehen und zu beweisen.

Vorlesungsinhalte: Differenzierbare Untermannigfaltigkeiten, Differentialformenkalkül (a la Cartan), Integration auf Untermannigfaltigkeiten.

In der Vergangenheit wurden diese Inhalte oft mit "Vektoranalysis" bezeichnet, allerdings oftmals dann auch nur der R3 betrachtet.
WueCampus-Kurs

Riemannian and Pseudo-Riemannian Geometry (Prof. Dr. Knut Hüper)

This course is partially based on the master course Differential Geometry M=ADGM-1V  (WS 18/19). We will try to cover

  • Riemannian and pseudo-Riemannian manifolds
  • Connections and Curvature
  • Geodesics and exponential mapping
  • Jacobi fields
  • Comparison theory

There is a vast literature on Riemannian geometry, less exists for differential manifolds with indefinite metrics. Although the emphasis will be on the positive definite case we try to strive indefinite metrics as well. Most of the books listed below are available in our library, some even in electronic form.

In due course there will be a Wuecampus website available for self enrolment for the exercises. Nevertheless, do not forget to enrol via Wuestudy for this course, as well.
Wuecampus

Topologie (Dr. Gregor Schaumann)

Dieser Bachelorkurs ist zweigeteilt aufgebaut. Der erste Teil beschäftigt sich mit den grundlegenden Definition von topologischen Räumen mittels offener und abgeschlossener Mengen sowie dem Begriff der Umgebung, von stetigen Abbildungen, Abzählbarkeits- und Trennungsaxiomen und Kompaktheitsbegriffen.
Universelle Konstruktionen wie direkte Summe, direktes Produkt, pullback, intiale, terminale Topologien, werden nach einer kurze Einführung in die Sprache der Kategorien einheitlich behandelt.
Beispiele aus der Analysis und Geometrie werden diskutiert.
Im zweiten Teil beschäftigen wir uns mit dem Begriff der Homotopie und betrachten die Fundamentalgruppe eines topologischen Raums.
WueCampus course

Research in Groups: Topics in Mathematical Image Processing (Prof. Dr. Knut Hüper)

Objective of this Research in Groups, Topics in Mathematical Image Processing, is to deepen the students' understanding of the mathematical fundamentals and background of mathematical image processing. Topics covered are discrete and continuous wavelet, Fourier and Radon transformations, filtering, epipolar geometry in computer vision, cartoon and texture image decomposition.

Reseach in Groups: ... up to homotopy (Dr. Gregor Schaumann, Prof. Dr. Stefan Waldmann)

The original motivation to study algebraic structures up to homotopy can be traced back to questions in algebraic topology where one was interested whether the cohomology of a given topological space carries an algebraic structure like a Lie algebra, an associative algebra etc. The question was then what structures on the space itself were responsible for this, leading to the notions of Lie algebras up to homotopy aka L_\infty-algebras etc. Ever since these structures have been studied for their own sake as they show up in various branches of mathematics. Recently, the usage of such L_\infty-algebras proved to be crucial for the understanding of deformation problems, leading in particular to the famous Kontsevich formality theorem. In this RiG we will establish the notions of L_\infty-algebras and their morphisms as the guiding example of algebraic structures up to homotopy. A first difficulty to overcome is that the very definition requires some more sophisticated notions of cofree coalgebras which we will introduce in detail.
WueCampus course

Geometric Mechanics (Prof. Dr. Stefan Waldmann)

This master course is a first introduction to geometric mechanics. We will discuss classical Newtonian mechanics using differential geometric methods within the context of symplectic geometry. The Hamiltonian approach to mechanics based on cotangent bundles as phase spaces will be central for this approach. The Lagrangean formulation of mechanics will be formulated on the tangent bundle of the configuration space. The comparison between the two will give, among many other aspects, a new look on Riemannian geometry through the symplectic looking glass. But geometric mechanics will not stop at these two (equivalent) versions but requires more general symplectic manifolds as phase spaces. In particular, the presence of symmetries and conserved quantities will lead to phase space reductions which yields quite generic symplectic manifolds as result. Finally, Poisson manifolds provide a yet more general framework of great importance when it comes to questions like quantization.
WueCampus course

Lineare Algebra 2 (Prof. Dr. Knut Hüper)

Vorlesung mit Übungen.
WueCampus Kurs

Differential Geometry (Prof. Dr. Stefan Waldmann)

This master course is a first introduction to the topics of differential geometry. We will discuss differentiable manifolds as geometric objects in an intrinsic approach. A particular emphasis will be put on the global calculus on manifolds, showing how the coordinate-based calculations can be minimized as far as possible. After manifolds, we discuss vector bundles as the next important ingredient in differential geometry. Integration on manifolds will be presented in two ways, using an orientation and without orientation. We will see the most important cohomology theories attached to manifolds. If time permits, we will also give a short introduction to Lie groups.
WueCampus course

Geometry of Gauge Theories (Prof. Dr. Stefan Waldmann)

The course can be seen as a follow-up of the last semester course on Analysis and Geometry of Classical Systems. We will discuss the construction of gauge theories based on the usage of principal fiber bundles and associated bundles. Beside the construction of several relevant models of gauge theories we will see other applications of principal fiber bundles like characteristic classes and resulting invariants. The second component will be a seminar by the students on more particular topics. I expect the participants to write a small proceeding-like summary of their seminar talks. Details on the topics can be found in the WueCampus course.
WueCampus course

Lineare Algebra 1 (Prof. Dr. Knut Hüper)

Vorlesung mit Übungen
WueCampus Kurs

Einführung in die Differentialgeometrie (Prof. Dr. Knut Hüper)

Vorlesung mit Übungen
WueCampus Kurs

Mathematik in den Naturwissenschaften (Prof. Dr. Knut Hüper)

Arbeitsgemeinschaft

Analysis and Geometry of Classical Systems (Prof. Dr. Stefan Waldmann)

In this course we will find geometric formulations for various field theories from mathematical physics:
the most important ones will be the Yang-Mills field theories from particle physics, but also other
field theories like the more phenomenological ones from fluid dynamics or solid state physics are in
principle part of this geometric approach. The main idea is that fields will be described as sections
of certain fiber bundles over a spacetime manifold. In many situations the fiber bundle is actually a
vector bundle but we will see situations where we have to go beyond this point of view. Closely related
to the geometric approach to field theory is the role of symmetries played by Lie group actions. In
fact, one can turn the accidental presence of a symmetry into a principle and construct field theories
based on the symmetry directly. This will essentially be the idea in the Yang-Mills field theories. In
the lecture we will mainly consider the kinematic aspects of field theory, i.e. the geometric description
of fields. Understanding the dynamical aspects, i.e. the study of actual field equations, is then a second and typically
much more difficult step.
WueCampus Kurs

Operator Algebras (Prof. Dr. Stefan Waldmann)

The course can be seen as a follow-up of the last semester course on Algebra and Dynamics of Quantum Systems.
WueCampus Kurs

Deformation Quantization (Dr. Chiara Esposito, Prof. Dr. Stefan Waldmann)

The program for the lecture component includes the following topics:

  • Quantization for R2n and first star products
  • Symbol calculus for differential operators and quantization of cotangent bundles
  • Star products on symplectic manifolds
  • Fedosov construction of star products
  • Fedosov construction on cotangent bundles

WueCampus course

Algebra and Dynamics of Quantum Systems (Prof. Dr. Stefan Waldmann)

The goal of this lecture is to understand the algebras of operators as they occur in quantum mechanics and in quantum field theory models. The important mathematical structure will be a C*-algebra. We will study such algebras in quite some detail together with their representation theory.
WueCampus Course

Topologie (Prof. Dr. Stefan Waldmann)

Diese Vorlesung zur mengentheoretischen Topologie kann zum einen als Grundlage und Vorbereitung für weiterführende Vorlesungen im Bereich der Analysis (insbesondere der Funktionalanalysis) sowie im Bereich der Geometrie gesehen werden. Zum anderen lässt sich in der Topologie der Weg in die Abstraktion und Allgemeinheit besonders gut illustrieren. Anhand bekannter Phänomene aus der Analysis wird versucht, den Kern dieser Situationen besonders klar herauszustellen und so eine Axiomatisierung der Analysis vorzunehmen. Dies wird am Ende nicht zuletzt für die Analysis der Grundvorlesungen sehr gewinnbringend sein, aber eben auch deutlich darüber hinausführen.

Der zentrale Begriff in der Topologie ist der des topologischen Raumes mit den stetigen Abbildungen zwischen solchen. Wir werden hier verschiedene Aspekte und Beispiele kennenlernen, welche es uns erlauben, völlig neue Gesichtspunkte in den Begriffen Konvergenz und Kompaktheit zu finden. Anwendungen in der Funktionalanalysis erfordern dann ein genaueres Studium verschiedener Funktionenräume von stetigen Funktionen auf topologischen Räumen.
WueCampus Kurs

Geometric Mechanics (Dr. Chiara Esposito)

Lecture with tutorials
WueCampus course

Mathematik für Informatiker 2 (Prof. Dr. Hüper)

Vorlesung mit Übungen

Ergänzungen zur Mathematik für Informatiker 2 (Prof. Dr. Hüper)

Vorlesung mit Übungen

Mathematical Image Processing (Prof. Dr. Hüper)

Lecture with tutorials

Deformation Quantization in R^n (Dr. Chiara Esposito)

Bachelor and master seminar

Mathematik für Informatiker I (Prof. Dr. Knut Hüper)

Vorlesung

Applied Differential Geometry (Prof. Dr. Knut Hüper)

Master seminar

Differential Geometry (Prof. Dr. Stefan Waldmann)

This master course is a first introduction to the topics of differential geometry. We will discuss differentiable manifolds as geometric objects in an intrinsic approach. A particular emphasis will be put on the global calculus on manifolds, showing how the coordinate-based calculations can be minimized as far as possible. After manifolds, we discuss vector bundles as the next important ingredient in differential geometry. Integration on manifolds will be presented in two ways, using an orientation and without orientation. We will see the most important cohomology theories attached to manifolds. If time permits, we will also give a short introduction to Lie groups.
WueCampus course

*-Representation Theory of *-Algebras (Prof. Dr. Stefan Waldmann)

In mathematical models of physical systems, the physical observables are typically described by C*-algebras or von Neumann algebras. While this gives a very elegant and powerful spectral calculus, many situations will not directly yield such nice classes of algebras. In various quantization theories the construction of C*-algebras is difficult or unclear. One way out is to focus on the algebraic features before taking into account the analytic issues as well. This is the main motivation for considering *-algebras without any analysis involved. Beyond quantization theories, other important examples are group algebras or universal enveloping algebras of Lie algebras but also algebras of differential operators. Here one typically has by no means a C*-norm available.

The aim of this RiG is to find a common algebraic framework for a reasonable representation theory of such algebras. It turns out that aspects of positivity can be formulated in an entirely algebraic way yielding interesting structures for the representation theory. In general, it will be difficult if not impossible to understand the representation theory of a given algebra completely. However, and this is quite surprising, it might be possible to compare it to the representation theory of a different algebra and determine whether or not the two algebras have the same representation theory. This is the main task of Morita theory, which we will present both in a purely ring-theoretic context and in an adapted version for *-algebras. We will develop the necessary category-theoretic notions to put the question of Morita equivalence in the right perspective.
WueCampus course

Algebraische Strukturen (Prof. Dr. Stefan Waldmann)

In diesem Bachelor-Seminar werden wir verschiedene algebraische Strukturen kennenlernen, die an vielen Stellen in der Mathematik auftreten.
WueCampus Kurs

Structure theory and representation of Lie algebras (Dr. Chiara Esposito)

Bachelor and master seminar

Geometrische Analysis (Prof. Dr. Knut Hüper)

Vorlesung mit Übungen

Geometric mechanics (Prof. Dr. Knut Hüper)

Lecture with tutorials

Mathematische Physik (Prof. Dr. Thorsten Ohl, Prof. Dr. Stefan Waldmann)

Masterseminar

Workshop Lineare Algebra: Universelle Eigenschaften (Thorsten Reichert)

Workshop

Riemann Surfaces (Prof. Dr. Oliver Roth, Prof. Dr. Stefan Waldmann)

In this seminar we investigate the basic theory of Riemann surfaces.

Lineare Algebra II (Prof. Dr. Stefan Waldmann)

Die zweisemestrige Vorlesung Lineare Algebra I und II ist neben der parallelen Analysisvorlesung die zentrale Grundlage eines jeden Mathematikstudiums. Ihre Bedeutung kann daher kaum überschätzt werden.

Zum einen werden die Begriffe der linearen Algebra, Vektorräume und linearen Abbildungen, in jeder weiteren Mathematikveranstaltung benötigt und benutzt werden. Dies gilt sowohl für die Entwicklung der theoretischen und angewandten Mathematik als auch für die zahlreichen Anwendungen, nicht zuletzt in der (mathematischen) Physik und der Wirtschaftsmathematik, aber auch in der Schulmathematik.

Zum anderen wird in der linearen Algebra Mathematik das erste Mal, im Vergleich zur Schulmathematik, auf wissenschaftlichem Niveau betrachtet. Insbesondere werden in der Vorlesung die grundlegenden Techniken der axiomatischen Herangehensweise der Mathematik, die Notwendigkeit einer stringenten Beweisführung und die zugehörige Abstraktion erlernt. Dies ist erfahrungsgemäß am Anfang nicht immer einfach.
WueCampus Kurs

Lorentz Geometry (Prof. Dr. Stefan Waldmann)

In this Research in Groups, we discuss Lorentzian geometry: every manifold can be equipped with a Riemannian metric. However, it needs some additional features that a manifold can also be equipped with a Lorentzian metric, where the signature is now (+, -, ..., -). Such inner products on every tangent space are now the crucial ingredient for a geometric formulation of general relativity: our spacetime carries a Lorentz metric which encodes not only the propagation of light but the whole causal structure of the spacetime. We will discuss the geometry arising from such a metric in detail. Particular emphasis will be put on the causal structure, Cauchy hypersurfaces and globally hyperbolic spacetimes, and, if time permits, propagation of linear waves.
WueCampus Course

Oid-Geometry (Dr. Chiara Esposito, Prof. Dr. Stefan Waldmann)

In this Research in Groups we will investigate various recent developments in differential geometry starting from Lie algebroid theory and including generalized geometries like Courant algebroids, generalized complex structures, Dirac structures and their applications in symplectic and Poisson geometry.
WueCampus course

Minimalflächen und harmonische Abbildungen (Prof. Dr. Anja Schlömerkemper, Prof. Dr. Oliver Roth, Prof. Dr. Stefan Waldmann)

Dieses lehrstuhlübergreifende Seminar behandelt Minimalflächen und harmonische Abbildungen, ein Thema an der Schnittstelle der Forschungsinteressen der drei Lehrstühle Mathematik in den Naturwissenschaften, Mathematische Physik und Funktionentheorie.

Minimalflächen sind Flächen im Raum mit "minimalem" Flächeninhalt und lassen sich mithilfe harmonischer Funktionen beschreiben. Sie spielen eine zentrale und überaus aktuelle Rolle sowohl in der Reinen als auch in der Angewandten Mathematik sowie in der Physik und in den Material- und Ingenieurswissenschaften. Bei der mathematischen Untersuchung von Minimalflächen kommen elegante Methoden aus verschiedenen mathematischen Gebieten wie der Differentialgeometrie, der Variationsrechnung und der komplexen Analysis zur Anwendung. Minimalflächen treten u.a. bei der Untersuchung von Seifenhäuten und der Konstruktion stabiler Objekte (z.B. in der Architektur und Automobilindustrie) in Erscheinung.

Lineare Algebra I (Prof. Dr. Stefan Waldmann)

Die zweisemestrige Vorlesung Lineare Algebra I und II ist neben der parallelen Analysisvorlesung die zentrale Grundlage eines jeden Mathematikstudiums. Ihre Bedeutung kann daher kaum überschätzt werden.

Zum einen werden die Begriffe der linearen Algebra, Vektorräume und linearen Abbildungen, in jeder weiteren Mathematikveranstaltung benötigt und benutzt werden. Dies gilt sowohl für die Entwicklung der theoretischen und angewandten Mathematik als auch für die zahlreichen Anwendungen, nicht zuletzt in der (mathematischen) Physik und der Wirtschaftsmathematik, aber auch in der Schulmathematik.

Zum anderen wird in der linearen Algebra Mathematik das erste Mal, im Vergleich zur Schulmathematik, auf wissenschaftlichem Niveau betrachtet. Insbesondere werden in der Vorlesung die grundlegenden Techniken der axiomatischen Herangehensweise der Mathematik, die Notwendigkeit einer stringenten Beweisführung und die zugehörige Abstraktion erlernt. Dies ist erfahrungsgemäß am Anfang nicht immer einfach.
WueCampus Kurs

Algebraische Deformationstheorie (Dr. Chiara Esposito, Prof. Dr. Stefan Waldmann)

In der algebraischen Deformationstheorie versucht man gewisse algebraische Strukturen wie etwa die Multiplikationsvorschrift in einer Algebra leicht abzuändern und anschließend zu prüfen, ob die neue Struktur zur alten in geeigneter Weise isomorph ist. Dies ist zunächst ein recht abstraktes und allgemeines Konzept, welches aber viele ganz konkrete und in der Anwendung relevante Fragestellungen beinhaltet. So kann man beispielsweise durch Deformation von algebraischen Strukturen folgende Probleme der mathematischen Physik formulieren:

  • Quantisierung wird als Deformation der klassischen Observablenalgebra, also der Funktionen auf dem Phasenraum, verstanden, wobei das kommutative Produkt in ein nicht-kommutatives aber nach wie vor assoziatives Produkt deformiert wird.
  • Der Übergang von Newtonscher Mechanik mit Galilei-Invarianz zur speziellen Relativitätstheorie mit Lorentz-Invarianz lässt sich als eine Deformation der Lie-Algebra der Galilei-Gruppe in die Lie-Algebra der Lorentz-Gruppe verstehen. Hier ist die algebraische Struktur also eine Lie-Algebra.

In der Arbeitsgemeinschaft wollen wir nun die Grundlagen der Deformationstheorie kennenlernen. Hier gilt es also zunächst zu klären, welche algebraischen Strukturen man deformieren möchte und was man unter einer Deformation genau zu verstehen hat. Da wir einen rein algebraischen Zugang wählen, betrachtet man formale Deformationen, also formale Potenzreihen in einem Deformationsparameter. In den obigen Beispielen ist der Deformationsparameter das Plancksche Wirkungsquantum beziehungsweise die inverse Lichtgeschwindigkeit. Es zeigt sich, dass sich jedes Deformationsproblem mit Hilfe einer geeigneten differentiell gradierten Lie-Algebra und deren Maurer-Cartan-Elementen beschreiben lässt. Existenz und Klassifikationsergebnisse zu Deformationsproblemen beschreibt man dann durch kohomologische Methoden. Wir werden diese neuen algebraischen Konzepte eingehend studieren. Neuere Zugänge zu differentiell gradierten Lie-Algebren benutzen wesentlich koalgebraische Ideen, welche wir im Detail diskutieren wollen.
WueCampus Kurs

Fortgeschrittene Themen der Mathematischen Physik (Prof. Dr. Thorsten Ohl, Prof. Dr. Stefan Waldmann)

In diesem Masterseminar werden wir die Haag-Kastler-Formulierung von Quantenfeldtheorien auf dem Minkowski-Raum kennenlernen.

Geometrische Mechanik (Prof. Dr. Stefan Waldmann)

Diese Mastervorlesung stellt eine Einführung in die geometrische Mechanik dar. Hier wird die klassische Newtonsche Mechanik mit differentialgeometrischen Methoden formuliert und im Kontext der symplektischen Geometrie untersucht. Zentral wird der Hamiltonsche Zugang zur Mechanik sein, der auf dem Kotangentenbündel des Konfigurationsraums zu Hause ist. Der aus der Physik eventuell besser bekannte Lagrangesche Ansatz wird differentialgeometrisch das Tangentenbündel erfordern. Wir werden diese beiden Sichtweisen sowie viele weitere, übergeordnete Aspekte der geometrischen Mechanik im Detail kennenlernen und anwenden. Es wird sich so insbesondere auch ein Hamiltonscher Blick auf die Riemannsche Geometrie ergeben, die den geodätischen Fluss auf einem Konfigurationsraum als einen Hamiltonschen Fluss zur kinetischen Energie auf dem Kotangentenbündel liefert. Eine große Rolle in der Theorie spielen die Symmetrien, welche über das Noether-Theorem zu Erhaltungsgrößen führen. Geometrisch werden Symmetrien durch Gruppenwirkungen von Lie-Gruppen implementiert, Erhaltungsgrößen beschreibt man dann durch Impulsabbildungen. Das Festlegen der Erhaltungsgrößen auf gewisse Werte vereinfacht die Bewegungsgleichungen und entspricht geometrisch einer Phasenraumreduktion. Eine wesentliche Erweiterung der geometrischen Mechanik ergibt sich schließlich, wenn man symplektische Phasenräume durch allgemeine Poisson-Mannigfaltigkeiten ersetzt.
WueCampus Kurs

Poisson-Geometrie (Dr. Chiara Esposito, Prof. Dr. Stefan Waldmann)

Poisson manifolds are smooth manifolds with the additional structure of a Poisson bracket for the smooth functions. Equivalently, this is the additional datum of a Poisson tensor, an antisymmetric contravariant tensor field satisfying a particular non-linear PDE, the Jacobi identity.
WueCampus Kurs

Differentialgeometrie (Prof. Dr. Stefan Waldmann)

Diese Mastervorlesung stellt eine erste Einführung in die Differentialgeometrie dar. Behandelt werden differenzierbare Mannigfaltigkeiten als geometrische Objekte in einem intrinsischen Zugang. In dieser Vorlesung wird ein großer Wert auf den globalen Kalkül auf Mannigfaltigkeiten gelegt und aufgezeigt, wie der koordinatenlastige Kalkül dadurch gewinnbringend ersetzt werden kann. Wir werden allgemeine Vektorbündel kennenlernen. Die Integrationstheorie auf Mannigfaltigkeiten wird in zwei Zugängen vorgestellt: mit und ohne Orientierung. Im orientierten Fall ergeben sich wichtige Verbindungen zu verschiedenen Kohomologie-Theorien. Wenn die Zeit es zulässt, werden wir noch eine Einführung in die Theorie der Lie-Gruppen geben.
WueCampus Kurs

Fortgeschrittene Themen der Mathematischen Physik (Prof. Dr. Thorsten Ohl, Prof. Dr. Stefan Waldmann)

Masterseminar
WueCampus Kurs

Analysis und Geometrie von klassischen Systemen (Prof. Dr. Stefan Waldmann)

Ziel der Vorlesung ist es, die geometrische Interpretation verschiedener Feldgleichungen der mathematischen Physik zu verstehen. Felder werden dabei als Abbildungen einer Mannigfaltigkeit, der Raumzeit, in eine andere Mannigfaltigkeit, die die Werte der Felder beschreibt, verstanden. Etwas allgemeiner und geometrischer interpretiert man Felder als Schnitte von Faserbündeln über der Raumzeit. Die Fasern, also die möglichen Feldwerte, können dabei Vektorräume aber auch allgemeinere Mannigfaltigkeiten sein.

Während dieser sehr allgemeine Feldbegriff durchaus schon interessante Beispiele liefert, etwa die Sigma-Modelle, spielen speziellere Feldtheorien eine besondere Rolle in der Physik. Hier werden wir vor allem Eichtheorien kennenlernen, welche auf mathematischer Seite durch Hauptfaserbündel und ihre assoziierten Bündel gegeben sind. Dazu werden wir die nötigen Symmetrien durch Lie-Gruppen und ihre glatten Wirkungen beschreiben.
WueCampus Kurs

Operatoralgebren (Prof. Dr. Stefan Waldmann)

Arbeitsgemeinschaft
WueCampus Kurs

Algebra und Dynamik von Quantensystemen (Prof. Dr. Stefan Waldmann)

Ziel der Vorlesung ist es, die in der Quantenmechanik und Quantenfeldtheorie auftretenden Algebren von Operatoren systematisch zu studieren. Die entscheidende mathematische Struktur dabei wird die einer C*-Algebra sein. Diese werden wir eingehend kennenlernen und ihre Darstellungen studieren.
WueCampus Kurs

Matrix-Lie-Gruppen und ihre Lie-Algebren (Prof. Dr. Stefan Waldmann)

Ziel dieses Bachelor-Seminars ist es, anhand von Beispielen einen ersten Einblick in die Theorie der Matrix-Lie-Gruppen und ihrer Lie-Algebren zu gewinnen. Die auftretenden Gruppen, wie die allgemeine lineare Gruppe, die spezielle lineare Gruppe oder die unitären und orthogonalen Gruppen, sind aus der Linearen Algebra bekannt. Wir werden sehen, wie die Exponentialabbildung für Matrizen dazu benutzt werden kann, viel über die Gruppenstruktur dieser Matrix-Gruppen zu lernen. Die Lie-Algebren werden in gewisser Hinsicht das infinitesimale Gegenstück zu den Gruppen sein.
WueCampus Kurs